You know muscle isn’t gained in the gym, right? No joke! It’s 100% true.

What occurs in the gym when you workout is muscle damage and breakdown, which is contrary to muscle growth.

This is where the recovery phase comes into play. Recovery is vital.

The amount of muscle and strength you gain from your workouts depends on how well your body repairs afterwards.

While a proper diet, consistent workouts without overtraining, and a good night’s sleep are important, so is the recovery phase and it shouldn’t be ignored.

Winners Post Workout was made knowing that it’s possible to speed up post-workout recovery via supplementation.

It’s a natural post-workout powder drink mix that helps increase muscle growth, advances recovery, and lessens muscle aches.

You’ll get the maximum results from your workouts without the problems associated with overtraining.

It’s very effective because:

Each ingredient is supported by scientific research and added in clinically effective doses.

The scientific research shows the actual benefits of using these ingredients and doses, which is why they’ve been used to make Winners Post Workout.

The formula is backed up with actual science, which is why it’s not marketed using false claims.

It is naturally flavored and has no artificial food dyes, bulk fillers, or needless ingredients.

Try Winners Post Workout if you want to workout harder in the gym, recover better, and thus gain muscle and strength quicker.

You won’t be disappointed. 

However, if for any reason you don’t love Winners Post Workout, just contact us to get an immediate refund, no questions asked. 

So what have you got to lose? Order now to realize more muscle and strength, improved post-workout recovery, and fewer muscle aches.

Truth be told, most supplements that claim to help grow muscles do nothing.

They are just expensive inactive substances aka fake pills.

Many companies sell natural testosterone boosters, which contain these well-known ingredients; Tribulus terrestris, ZMA, and/or D-aspartic acid.

Scientific research about these ingredients reveals:

1. There is no result on testosterone levels, body composition, or exercise performance after taking Tribulus terrestris. 1, 2, 3

2. Your testosterone levels will not rise after taking ZMA except if you’re very deficient in zinc. 4

3. There may be a slight, temporary increase in testosterone levels after taking D-aspartic acid. 5, 6

Other disappointing and useless ingredients used in testosterone boosters include:

Saw palmetto

Horny goat weed

Eurycoma longifolia jack (aka Tongkat ali or Longjack)

Holy basil

Velvet antler

Horny goat weed and eurycoma longifolia jack don’t have believable, valid human research behind them, while saw palmetto and velvet antler lack proof of being able to improve testosterone production.

Another type of “muscle building” supplement that is ineffective is branched chain amino acids (BCAAs). 

Yes, there are many scientific papers that show that BCAAs can better immune function, lessen fatigue and muscle damage caused by exercise, and improve post-workout muscle growth but there is also a dispute about them.

The dispute is that most of this scientific research applies to athletes who train several hours per day and not to the typically healthy person who eats a high protein diet and sensibly works out.

Such BCAA studies lack substance for the majority of us.

Research indicates that getting your BCAAs from the foods you eat is more beneficial than from BCAA supplementation. 7

Despite these points, not all muscle building supplements are ineffective.

There are indeed natural, research-proven ingredients that can help you build muscle, boost strength, and quicken recovery.

No, they can’t take the place of eating a proper diet or regular workouts, nor are they pivotal, but they can help increase your results.

That’s why Winners Post Workout was made.

It’s a natural post-workout powder drink mix that helps increase muscle growth, advances recovery, and reduces muscle soreness.

You’ll get the maximum results from your workouts without the problems associated with overtraining.


What’s In It?

Reading the ingredients reveals…


Creatine Monohydrate

Creatine is a natural blend of L-arginine, glycine, and methionine, all of which are amino acids. 

Creatine can be naturally produced by your body as well as stored after eating different foods such as meat, fish, and eggs.

It works to strengthen your body’s ability to create cellular energy called adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

Your cells must reduce ATP into smaller molecules in order to use it. During this process, by-products form and convert to ATP for further use. An important by-product that’s made during this process is adenosine diphosphate (ADP).

Your cells will be able to work more if they can both store more ATP and reproduce it quickly after using it. Every system in your body, including your muscle cells, functions this way. 8

Creatine plays an important role when reproducing ATP, which is why your muscles can do more work if you supplement with it.

Creatine boosts the reproduction process by providing an element that lets your body quickly change ADP into ATP, which greatly boosts the functional capacity of your muscles. 9

The drawback in this energy system, however, is that the amount of creatine naturally stored in your body is very limited. 10

Once it’s gone, this energy system ends and your body must then look to glucose and fatty acids to keep producing ATP.

Therefore, by supplementing with creatine, you greatly raise the levels of creatine stored in your body, and the creatine levels in your muscles rise by upto 20%. 11

This gives your muscle cells more energy and this is why research proves that taking creatine monohydrate supplements helps to:

1. Increase muscle and boost strength 12, 13, 14, 15

2. Raise anaerobic performance 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21

3. Decrease muscle aches and injury from exercise 22, 23

4. Raise glycogen storage levels in muscles 24

5. Keep lean mass and strength during calorie restrictions 25

Claims that creatine can be bad for your kidneys are greatly inflated. 26, 27

Healthy people can enjoy the benefits of using creatine both short-term and long-term without worrying about adverse side effects.

However, people with kidney disease being treated with diuretics should avoid using creatine. 28, 29, 30

A clinically effective dose of creatine monohydrate is 3 – 5 grams per day. 31

Winners Post Workout contains 4 grams of creatine monohydrate per serving.


L-Carnitine L-Tartrate

L-carnitine is an amino acid that is naturally present in meat and dairy foods.

Your body can create it naturally as long as you eat enough of two more amino acids, lysine and methionine.

L-tartrate is a salt that increases the digestion of other nutrients.

L-carnitine performs many vital bodily functions relating to cellular energy. 32

Since your muscles must be able to produce vast amounts of energy, it’s logical that most of the L-carnitine inside your body lies within your muscles. 33

So L-carnitine supplementation helps you significantly increase the levels of carnitine in both your body and, especially, your muscles. 34

According to scientific research, supplementing with L-Carnitine L-Tartrate helps to:

1. Decrease muscle aches and injury from exercise 35, 36, 37

2. Better muscle repair 38

3. Boost insulin sensitivity 39

A clinically effective dose of L-carnitine L-tartrate is 1 – 2 grams per serving. 40

Winners Post Workout contains 1.5 grams of L-carnitine L-tartrate per serving.


Corosolic Acid

Corosolic acid is normally found in banaba plant leaves.

Based on scientific research, taking corosolic acid helps improve the control of blood glucose and boosts insulin signaling. 41

This results in improved amino acid and glucose absorption after working out. 42

A clinically effective dose of corosolic acid is 10 mg per serving.

Winners Post Workout contains 10 mg per serving. 43

No Artificial Flavors, Food Dyes, or Unnecessary Fillers

Artificial flavors just aren’t needed, which is why you won’t find any in Winners PostWorkout. Natural flavors taste just as good.

Many post-workout powders contain imitation food dyes called “azo dyes.”

They are labelled as FD&C Yellow #5 (aka tartrazine), FD&C Blue #1 (aka brilliant blue), and FD&C Red #40 (aka allura red ac) just to name a few.

Some say that consuming food dyes isn’t very harmful to your health. However, studies indicate that ingesting such chemicals can cause various types of harm within your body.44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51

The Bottom Line

Winners Post Workout is a natural post-workout powder drink mix that helps increase muscle growth, advances recovery, and lessens muscle aches.

You’ll get the maximum results from your workouts without the problems associated with overtraining.

It’s very effective because:

Each ingredient is supported by scientific research and added in clinically effective doses.

The scientific research shows the actual benefits of using these ingredients and doses, which is why they’ve been used to make Winners Post Workout.

The formula is backed up with actual science, which is why it’s not marketed using false claims.

It is naturally flavored and has no artificial food dyes, bulk fillers, or needless ingredients.

Try Winners Post Workout if you want to workout harder in the gym, recover better, and thus gain muscle and strength quicker.

You won’t be disappointed. 

However, if for any reason you don’t love Winners Post Workout, just contact us to get an immediate refund, no questions asked. 

So what have you got to lose? Order now to realize more muscle and strength, improved post-workout recovery, and fewer muscle aches.

 

Scientific Sources

1. Short term impact of Tribulus terrestris intake on doping control analysis of endogenous steroids.
Saudan C, Baume N, Emery C, Strahm E, Saugy M. Forensic Sci Int. 2008;178(1):e7-10. doi:10.1016/j.forsciint.2008.01.003.

2. The effects of Tribulus terrestris on body composition and exercise performance in resistance-trained males.
Antonio J, Uelmen J, Rodriguez R, Earnest C. Int J Sport Nutr. 2000;10(2):208-215. doi:10.1123/ijsnem.10.2.208.

3. The effect of five weeks of Tribulus terrestris supplementation on muscle strength and body composition during preseason training in elite rugby league players.
Rogerson S, Riches CJ, Jennings C, Weatherby RP, Meir RA, Marshall-Gradisnik SM. J strength Cond Res. 2007;21(2):348-353. doi:10.1519/R-18395.1.

4. Serum testosterone and urinary excretion of steroid hormone metabolites after administration of a high-dose zinc supplement.
Koehler K, Parr MK, Geyer H, Mester J, Schänzer W. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009;63(1):65-70. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602899.

5. D-Aspartic acid supplementation combined with 28 days of heavy resistance training has no effect on body composition, muscle strength, and serum hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in resistance-trained men.
Willoughby DS, Leutholtz B. Nutr Res. 2013;33(10):803-810. doi:10.1016/j.nutres.2013.07.010.

6. D-Aspartate, a Key Element for the Improvement of Sperm Quality.
D’Aniello G, Ronsini S, Notari T, et al. Adv Sex Med. 2012;02(04):45-53. doi:10.4236/asm.2012.24008.

7. Effect of protein/essential amino acids and resistance training on skeletal muscle hypertrophy: A case for whey protein.
Hulmi JJ, Lockwood CM, Stout JR. Nutr Metab. 2010;7. doi:10.1186/1743-7075-7-51.

8. The creatine kinase system and pleiotropic effects of creatine.
Wallimann T, Tokarska-Schlattner M, Schlattner U. Amino Acids. 2011;40(5):1271-1296. doi:10.1007/s00726-011-0877-3.

9. Systems bioenergetics of creatine kinase networks: physiological roles of creatine and phosphocreatine in regulation of cardiac cell function.
Guzun R, Timohhina N, Tepp K, et al. Amino Acids. 2011;40(5):1333-1348. doi:10.1007/s00726-011-0854-x.

10. Mitochondrial creatine kinase in human health and disease.
Schlattner U, Tokarska-Schlattner M, Wallimann T. Biochim Biophys Acta – Mol Basis Dis. 2006;1762(2):164-180. doi:10.1016/j.bbadis.2005.09.004.

11. Creatine ingestion favorably affects performance and muscle metabolism during maximal exercise in humans.
Casey A, Constantin-Teodosiu D, Howell S, Hultman E, Greenhaff RL. Am J Physiol. 1996;271(1 PART 1). doi:10.1152/ajpendo.1996.271.1.e31.

12. Effect of creatine supplementation on body composition and performance: a meta-analysis.
Branch JD. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2003 Jun;13(2):198-226. doi:10.1123/ijsnem.13.2.198.

13. Effect of creatine and beta-alanine supplementation on performance and endocrine responses in strength/power athletes.
Hoffman J, Ratamess N, Kang J, Mangine G, Faigenbaum A, Stout J. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2006 Aug;16(4):430-46. doi:10.1123/ijsnem.16.4.430.

14. Effects of two and five days of creatine loading on muscular strength and anaerobic power in trained athletes.
Law YL, Ong WS, GillianYap TL, Lim SC, Von Chia E. J Strength Cond Res. 2009 May;23(3):906-14. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181a06c59. doi:10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181a06c59.

15. Effects of creatine supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and weightlifting performance.
Rawson ES, Volek JS. J strength Cond Res. 2003;17(4):822-831. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14636102. Accessed October 22, 2019.

16. Effect of creatine phosphate supplementation on anaerobic working capacity and body weight after two and six days of loading in men and women.
Eckerson JM, Stout JR, Moore GA, et al. J Strength Cond Res. 2005 Nov;19(4):756-63. doi:10.1519/R-16924.1

17. Combined creatine and sodium bicarbonate supplementation enhances interval swimming.
Mero AA, Keskinen KL, Malvela MT, Sallinen JM. J Strength Cond Res. 2004 May;18(2):306-310. doi:10.1519/R-12912.1.

18. Effect of two and five days of creatine loading on anaerobic working capacity in women.
Eckerson JM, Stout JR, Moore GA, Stone NJ, Nishimura K, Tamura K. J Strength Cond Res. 2004 Feb;18(1):168-73. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14971965. Accessed October 22, 2019.

19. Effects of high dose oral creatine supplementation on anaerobic capacity of elite wrestlers.
Koçak S, Karli U. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2003 Dec;43(4):488-92. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14767410. Accessed October 22, 2019.

20. Effects of four weeks of high-intensity interval training and creatine supplementation on critical power and anaerobic working capacity in college-aged men.
Kendall KL, Smith AE, Graef JL, Fukuda DH, Moon JR, Beck TW, Cramer JT, Stout JR. J Strength Cond Res. 2009 Sep;23(6):1663-9. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181b1fd1f.

21. The effects of creatine loading and gender on anaerobic running capacity.
Fukuda DH, Smith AE, Kendall KL, Dwyer TR, Kerksick CM, Beck TW, Cramer JT, Stout JR. J Strength Cond Res. 2010 Jul;24(7):1826-33. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181e06d0e.

22. Effect of short-term creatine supplementation on markers of skeletal muscle damage after strenuous contractile activity.
Bassit RA, Pinheiro CH, Vitzel KF, Sproesser AJ, Silveira LR, Curi R. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2010 Mar;108(5):945-55. doi: 10.1007/s00421-009-1305-1. Epub 2009 Dec 3.

23. The effect of creatine supplementation upon inflammatory and muscle soreness markers after a 30km race.
Santos RV, Bassit RA, Caperuto EC, Costa Rosa LF. Life Sci. 2004 Sep 3;75(16):1917-24.

24. Muscle glycogen supercompensation is enhanced by prior creatine supplementation.
Nelson AG, Arnall DA, Kokkonen J, Day R, Evans J. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001 Jul;33(7):1096-100.

25. Creatine supplementation affects muscle creatine during energy restriction.
Rockwell JA, Rankin JW, Toderico B. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2001;33(1):61-68. doi:10.1097/00005768-200101000-00011.

26. Adverse effects of creatine supplementation: fact or fiction?
Poortmans JR, Francaux M. Sports Med. 2000 Sep;30(3):155-70. Review. doi:10.2165/00007256-200030030-00002.

27. American College of Sports Medicine roundtable. The physiological and health effects of oral creatine supplementation.
Terjung RL, Clarkson P, Eichner ER, Greenhaff PL, Hespel PJ, Israel RG, Kraemer WJ, Meyer RA, Spriet LL, Tarnopolsky MA, Wagenmakers AJ, Williams MH. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. Vol 32. ; 2000:706-717. doi:10.1097/00005768-200003000-00024.

28. Effects of creatine supplementation on renal function.
Yoshizumi WM, Tsourounis C. J Herb Pharmacother. 2004;4(1):1-7. doi:10.1300/J157v04n01_01.

29. Is the use of oral creatine supplementation safe?
Bizzarini E, De Angelis L. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2004;44(4):411-416.

30. Few adverse effects of long-term creatine supplementation in a placebo-controlled trial.
Groeneveld GJ, Beijer C, Veldink JH, Kalmijn S, Wokke JH, van den Berg LH. Int J Sports Med. 2005;26(4):307-313. doi:10.1055/s-2004-817917.

31. Creatine supplementation and exercise performance: Recent findings.
Bemben MG, Lamont HS. Sport Med. 2005;35(2):107-125. doi:10.2165/00007256-200535020-00002.

32. L-Carnitine – Metabolic Functions and Meaning in Humans Life.
Pekala J, Patkowska-Sokola B, Bodkowski R, et al. Curr Drug Metab. 2011;12(7):667-678. doi:10.2174/138920011796504536.

33. Pharmacokinetics of L-carnitine. Clin Pharmacokinet.
Evans AM, Fornasini G. 2003;42(11):941-967. doi:10.2165/00003088-200342110-00002.

34. Chronic oral ingestion of L-carnitine and carbohydrate increases muscle carnitine content and alters muscle fuel metabolism during exercise in humans.
Wall BT, Stephens FB, Constantin-Teodosiu D, Marimuthu K, Macdonald IA, Greenhaff PL. J Physiol. 2011;589(Pt 4):963-973. doi:10.1113/jphysiol.2010.201343.

35. The Effects of L-Carnitine L-Tartrate Supplementation on Hormonal Responses to Resistance Exercise and Recovery.
Kraemer WJ, Volek JS, French DN, et al. J Strength Cond Res. 2003;17(3):455-462.

36. L-Carnitine L-tartrate supplementation favorably affects markers of recovery from exercise stress.
Volek JS, Kraemer WJ, Rubin MR, Gómez AL, Ratamess NA, Gaynor P. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2002;282(2):E474-82. doi:10.1152/ajpendo.00277.2001.

37. l-Carnitine l-tartrate supplementation favorably affects biochemical markers of recovery from physical exertion in middle-aged men and women.
Ho JY, Kraemer WJ, Volek JS, Fragala MS, Thomas GA, Dunn-Lewis C, Coday M, Häkkinen K, Maresh CM. Metabolism. 2010;59(8):1190-1199. doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2009.11.012.

38. Ibid.

39. Effects of oral L-carnitine supplementation on insulin sensitivity indices in response to glucose feeding in lean and overweight/obese males.
Galloway SD, Craig TP, Cleland SJ. Amino Acids. 2011 Jul;41(2):507-15. doi: 10.1007/s00726-010-0770-5. Epub 2010 Oct 21.

40. Responses of criterion variables to different supplemental doses of L-carnitine L-tartrate.
Spiering BA, Kraemer WJ, Vingren JL, et al. J Strength Cond Res. 2007;21(1):259-264. doi:10.1519/00124278-200702000-00046.

41. Effect of corosolic acid on postchallenge plasma glucose levels.
Fukushima M, Matsuyama F, Ueda N, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2006;73(2):174-177. doi:10.1016/j.diabres.2006.01.010.

42. Antidiabetic activity of a standardized extract (Glucosol) from Lagerstroemia speciosa leaves in Type II diabetics.
Judy W V, Hari SP, Stogsdill WW, Judy JS, Naguib YMA, Passwater R. A dose-dependence study. J Ethnopharmacol. 2003;87(1):115-117. doi:10.1016/s0378-8741(03)00122-3.

43. Effect of corosolic acid on postchallenge plasma glucose levels.
Fukushima M, Matsuyama F, Ueda N, et al. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2006;73(2):174-177. doi:10.1016/j.diabres.2006.01.010.

44. Toxicological significance of azo dye metabolism by human intestinal microbiota.
Feng J, Cerniglia CE, Chen H. Front Biosci (Elite Ed). 2012;4:568-586.

45. Effects of tartrazine on exploratory behavior in a three-generation toxicity study in mice.
Tanaka T, Takahashi O, Oishi S, Ogata A. Reprod Toxicol. 2008;26(2):156-163. doi:10.1016/j.reprotox.2008.07.001.

46. Artificial food dyes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Kanarek RB. Nutr Rev. 2011;69(7):385-391. doi:10.1111/j.1753-4887.2011.00385.x.

47. Meta-analysis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, restriction diet, and synthetic food color additives.
Nigg JT, Lewis K, Edinger T, Falk M. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2012;51(1):86-97.e8. doi:10.1016/j.jaac.2011.10.015.

48. Food additives and hyperactive behaviour in 3-year-old and 8/9-year-old children in the community: a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial.
McCann D, Barrett A, Cooper A, et al. [Erratum appears in Lancet. 2007 Nov 3;370(9598):1542]. Lancet. 2007;370(9598):1560-1567.

49. Prolonged use of the food dye tartrazine (FD&C yellow no 5) and its effects on the gastric mucosa of Wistar rats.
Moutinho ILD, Bertges LC, Assis RVC. Braz J Biol. 2007;67(1):141-145. doi:10.1590/s1519-69842007000100019.

50. Effect of food azo dye tartrazine on learning and memory functions in mice and rats, and the possible mechanisms involved.
Gao Y, Li C, Shen J, Yin H, An X, Jin H. J Food Sci. 2011;76(6):T125-9. doi:10.1111/j.1750-3841.2011.02267.x.

51. Effect of food azo dyes tartrazine and carmoisine on biochemical parameters related to renal, hepatic function and oxidative stress biomarkers in young male rats.
Amin KA, Abdel Hameid H 2nd, Abd Elsttar AH. Food Chem Toxicol. 2010;48(10):2994-2999. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2010.07.039.

Winners Nutrition Postworkout Supplement Facts

DIRECTIONS: Mix one (1) scoop with 8-10 fl oz (237-296 ml) of water. Adjust liquid level for desired flavor. Take with a POST-WORKOUT meal. On non-training days, take with the largest meal of the day. For optimal results, take daily.

TIPS:
a) Take after training with a protein and carbohydrate-rich meal because that’s when creatine is most effective.

If this isn’t possible, then take it with a meal that only has carbohydrates.

b) Take it every day to maintain higher levels of creatine in your muscles.

c) You don’t have to cycle it

d) If you stop supplementing with creatine, your body will continue to produce it naturally, but at lower levels.

WARNING: Do not use if: you are pregnant, nursing, under the age of 18, experience any adverse effects, or the seal is broken or missing upon receipt. Consult a physician prior to use if you are taking medication or have a medical condition.

Use only as directed.

Store in a cool, dry place.

Keep out of the reach of children.

FAQs

1. Will creatine really help me during my workouts?

Yes.

You’ll start to notice more strength, anaerobic endurance, and less muscle soreness after your first week of taking it.

Over time, creatine’s indirect effect on muscle development become apparent.

Long term, the more weight you lift and the faster you can recover, the more muscle you’ll gain.

2. If I stop taking creatine, will I lose my muscle gains?

No.

Based on scientific studies, the muscle mass you gain from taking creatine will remain even after you stop taking it. 1

1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15263100

3. Is creatine a steroid?

No.

Creatine has a different chemical composition since it comes from three amino acids, L-arginine, L-glycine, and L-methionine.

As a result, it functions differently in the body.

4. Is it safe to take creatine?

Yes.

Being widely researched for its performance benefits, creatine offers no negative effects among healthy adults. 1, 2

1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16814437

2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15795816

5. Will taking creatine harm my kidneys?

No.

Based on scientific studies, if you are a healthy adult, creatine will not harm your kidneys, even if you’re on a diet high in protein. 1

Creatinine, which is creatine’s waste product, has been known to cause alarm when it comes to kidney function, also this has proven to be a false positive in people supplementing with creatine. 2

Based on a university study, you’re not likely to experience problems even if your kidneys don’t function normally and you take up to 20 grams of creatine per day. 3

Nevertheless, please see your doctor if you have kidney problems before supplementing with creatine.

1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23680457

2. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15273072

3. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20060630

6. Will creatine make me feel bloated?

No.

While bloating was an issue with creatine in the past, better manufacturing processes have largely eliminated this.

7. Should I cycle creatine?

No.

Since it has no impact on your endocrine system nor is it a steroid, there is no need to cycle it.

It’s not recommended to cycle creatine because you’d have to wait for it to collect in your muscles again before realizing its benefits, which is detrimental.

8. Should I load creatine?

You can but it’s not necessary especially if you’re supplementing with it for the first time.

Loading creatine will cause it to collect in your muscles faster so you can realise its benefits faster.

Based on scientific studies, the normal way to load creatine is to take 20 grams per day for 5-7 days. Then maintain it by taking just 5 grams per day. 1

To load Winners PostWorkout, take 4 servings per day for 5 - 7 days, then just one (1) serving per day afterwards.

1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15707376

9. Can females use creatine?

Yes.

It’s to your advantage to take it since it will not cause water retention.

10. Can I use creatine if I’m on a fat loss diet?

Yes.

While mostly used during bulking cycles, it’s fine to take creatine during cutting cycles too.

While in a caloric deficit, creatine supplementation helps you retain muscle and strength, which is necessary to enhance your body composition. 1

1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11194113

11. What’s the best form of creatine to take?

Hands down, the winner is creatine monohydrate.

It’s also the most commonly studied and used for good reason.

Other forms like creatine hydrochloride, buffered creatine, creatine nitrate, liquid creatine, creatine ethyl ester, creatine citrate, and others aren’t any better based on scientific studies.

12. Can I become bald after taking creatine?

For men with male pattern baldness, creatine may raise dihydrotestosterone levels, which can raise the frequency of balding. 1

However, more studies are necessary to verify this.

1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19741313

13. Will I get cramps after taking creatine?

No.

Based on a study conducted on university football players, creatine caused less cramping than in people who didn’t supplement with it. 1

1. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14608430

14. Why does Winners PostWorkout cost more than other creatine-based supplements?

The old adage “you get what you pay for” is true here.

Creatine monohydrate isn’t the only effective ingredient inside.

This is a post-workout recovery supplement that also contains L-carnitine L-tartrate and corosolic acid, which help quicken muscle recovery and lower muscle soreness.

15. What is the meaning of “clinically effective dose”?

Doses help measure the efficacy level of an ingredient and their results have been published in scientific literature.

A dose of an ingredient that is clinically effective means that such a dose has been proven in scientific studies to offer maximum benefit and minimum side effects.

Compared to other post-workout supplements, Winners PostWorkout may seem to have high doses of each ingredient but, honestly, such doses are the right amounts needed to boost muscle gain, strength, and workout recovery.

This also helps you see how pathetically underdosed other post-workout powders are.

16. Should I take Winners PostWorkout everyday?

Yes.

Taking creatine every day, even on your non-workout days, will give you the best results.

17. What should I do if Winners PostWorkout is too strong or sweet?

Just add more water to find your tolerance level.

18. Is Winners PostWorkout gluten-free?

Yes.

19. Can vegetarians take Winners PostWorkout?

Yes, since none of its ingredients come from meat.

20. Can vegans take Winners PostWorkout?

Yes, since no ingredients come from animal sources.


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